EnergyWatch

Trump team's memo hints at broad shake-up of US energy policy

President-elect Donald Trump's advisers are in the midst of writing up plans to reshape programs at the Energy Department which intend to keep nuclear power plants on line and identify staff who played a role in promoting President Barack Obama's climate agenda.

Photo: Stephen B. Morton/AP/POLFOTO/news

Advisers to President-elect Donald Trump are developing plans to reshape Energy Department programs, help keep aging nuclear plants online and identify staff who played a role in promoting President Barack Obama's climate agenda.

The transition team has asked the agency to list employees and contractors who attended United Nations climate meetings, along with those who helped develop the Obama administration's social cost of carbon metrics, used to estimate and justify the climate benefits of new rules. The advisers are also seeking information on agency loan programs, research activities and the basis for its statistics, according to a five-page internal document circulated by the Energy Department on Wednesday. The document lays out 65 questions from the Trump transition team, sources within the agency said.

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